Archive for the ‘environmental’ Category

Due salti da solo

Friday, September 23rd, 2011
AM silhouette jumping during sunset over Ocean Beach

Indian Summer sunset at Ocean Beach, San Francisco

AM silhouette jump during the sun setting over Ocean Beach

Indian Summer sunset at Ocean Beach, San Francisco

These two shots were taken within minutes of each other. Isn’t it amazing how quickly the light transforms?

And here’s how the sky looked just minutes before the two jumps. (Taken with an iPhone)

Sun dips into the Pacific Ocean

The end of today

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Angel Island escapade

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011
Ning jumping on Angel Island
Ning jumping at Angel Island
Ning portrait at Angel Island
Ning portrait at Angel Island
Ning portrait at Angel Island
Ning portrait on Angel Island

A couple of weekends ago, I boarded a sailboat headed to Angel Island with five models I’d never met before and a handful of other photographers. Once we docked at the island, the skipper who happens to be a Nikon shooter asked if I’d like to try out his lenses.

“Which one would you like to try?” he asked.

“Um, how about the 300mm,” I said.

“Really?” he asked.

I grinned and nodded.

The Nikon 300mm f2.8 lens is a tank. And also happens to be $5,000. He said okay and helped me put it on my D700. Then he made the mistake of turning around to peer back into his photo case. Before he turned back around to me; I had already scampered off the boat, off the dock, and onto Angel Island with one of the models by my side. I cradled the 8-lb. camera and lens with both arms like a newborn and we giggled like elementary school BFF’s. We made it to the shady side of the island past the picnic tables and went to work.

When we got back to the boat, one of the other photographers on board said that the skipper joked that since I disappeared I must have hopped on the ferry back to San Francisco with his lens. I wouldn’t do that! After returning the tank, he told me he never shoots that lens without a tripod. Too heavy. Heh. I guess all the early morning bootcamp workouts have been paying off because I handheld it for 130 shots.

Model: Ning Ma
MUA: Cindy Crabtree

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Fill ‘er up

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011
AM jumps at an abandoned gas station.

Something new, somewhere old

What ever caused the demise of the full service gas station? Apparently, the oil crisis of the 1970s marked the beginning of the end of full service gas stations. Oil companies figured that people wanted to pump their own gas to save a few pennies. Soon the attendants, who would walk up to your rolled-down window and ask, “leaded or unleaded?” then wash your windows and check your oil while your gas was getting pumped, were no longer needed. Feeling nostalgic? It’s illegal to pump your own gas in Oregon or New Jersey so you can experience the luxury of full service in both of those states.

Flashback: When I was eight years old, I used to think the word “motor” meant addiction. I clearly recall sitting in a passenger seat when my dad drove to the gas station and seeing signs that read “No Smoking. Stop your motor.”

Source: goretro

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Glamping

Friday, July 15th, 2011
glamping-2
glamping-1
glamping-4
Elyssa holds Raleigh in a blankie
glamping-diptych
glamping-6

Glamping = glamorous camping. Satisfying your craving for the outdoors and your penchant for a good meal, nice glass of wine, a comfortable bed, and (when you’re with me) an impromptu rockstar photo shoot.

Earlier this summer, over two dozen of my friends and I ventured out to Angels Camp in Frog County for the weekend. We stayed in cabins, had full electricity and wi-fi, took coin-free hot showers, and filled our bellies with some deliciously prepared meals.

Some of us went ziplining, one of us foraged for wild mushrooms, most of us enjoyed Starbucks in the morning and ice cream cones in the afternoon. Despite this, we totally roughed it: we got bitten by bugs, caught frogs, had a frightening encounter with a wild horse, let a toddler swallow (nearly) whole a bag of chewy bears, and went nose to nose with an emu. Oh yeah, we roughed it alright.

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One Light Workshop

Friday, June 10th, 2011

Last weekend, I attended Zack Arias’ One Light Workshop in the Dogpatch neighborhood of San Francisco and spent 14 hours learning more about and practicing off-camera flash photography using speedlights. Here are some of the photographs I shot. Next up: memorizing reciprocals, practicing a lot, and pumping up more gravity-defying ideas with the one-light techniques I learned. Thank you for the well-run and -taught workshop, Zack!

Models: Whitney Nichole, Maya Carina, Charles Wynn, Damian Marhefka

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Week 51: I love the lightlife

Friday, December 24th, 2010
AM in the rain on Christmas Tree Lane

51/52

Every December for the past 60 years, 52 homeowners on Thompson Street in Alameda string thousands of lights and display other holiday decorations for Christmas. Every home on Christmas Tree Lane is aglow with lights and even the center median is decorated.

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Week 50: A jump in the dark

Friday, December 17th, 2010
AM jumps amid shadows and lights

50/52

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Week 47: Synchronized Air Guitrampolining

Friday, November 26th, 2010
Laura, Claudine, Genevieve and Jeanine at the House of Air

47/52

A few of the many things I’m thankful for:

  • family
  • friends
  • being healthy
  • huge trampoline parks in historic airplane hangars

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Week 46: The Underland

Friday, November 19th, 2010
levitation underwater image

46/52

The month of October for me was bookended by two entirely different photography workshops. A few weeks ago I posted about the Eddie Adams Workshop, a photojournalism mecca where reality, observation, timeliness and documentation are essential. The polar opposite would then be an emphasis on creation, illusion, and trickery. And, for that, I chose to attend a one-day levitation workshop in Los Angeles with Natalie and Brooke.

Levitation is not a new subject for me; but levitation without jumping? Movement in low, all natural light? Definitely new. And definitely inspiring. The experience reminded me of my college days as a print journalism major who realized too late that I would have fit in much better as a creative writing or radio/tv/film major. One of the highlights of college was definitely the insane amount of hours I spent with three RTVF majors recreating the depths of Dante’s Inferno for a multimedia journey through hell.

Truth or fiction? I appreciate both sides of the coin as far as photography goes. Neither (when good) is easy. They both require patience, vision, and a skill for storytelling. The primary lesson I learned from both workshops is that when the photographer feels something, it will come out in the pictures. In New York, I felt like someone socked me in the emotional gut almost the entire time that I was shooting pictures of a man who simply and clearly wants to die. And while the image above was not created wholly in camera, it wasn’t until l actually felt discombobulated looking at it that I sensed it was heading where I wanted it to go.

What do you think? Do you feel anything when you look at it?

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Week 39: Something wicked this way comes

Friday, October 1st, 2010
Week 39: Something wicked

39/52

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